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YOLO is fueling risky career moves

Andrew

This is re posted.


Andrew Keller

Every morning, Larry and I dig into a form or idea that has caught our eye. Our hope is that our chat inspires you to never stop thinking and possibly challenges you in a new way. If you'd like to help support the show, please visit patreon.com slash reposted. Thank you for stopping by.


Unknown Speaker

Give it a little baby,


Andrew Keller

you only live once came across this idea, this concept on LinkedIn is that YOLO is fueling risky career moves. Basically we're saying with the pandemic that's pushed people to start a side hustle or start their own business. And those that are still working are threatening to quit unless employers allow flexibility to continue some of the larger companies like Facebook and LinkedIn and I think maybe Twitter have gone on record saying is if you want to work remote from here on out, that's fine with us. And so I've also heard some other companies being like, you know what, you're coming back five days a week, we're going back to how it was. So I think we're gonna see especially the new generation with a with different priorities, more willing to take risks, and I think that's possibly going to be for the best. What do you think? Are you going to get a new job?


Larry

I would like to start with this. Man, y'all don't get it? Do you type of money, everybody to act and like the new you? That's Drake. That's y'all. Oh, by the way, just in case for the kids who didn't get, um, I was reading this article in the times that I get it was like, so skeptical of young people going living out their best life like going and traveling and investing money in cryptocurrency and I was like, what are what are you supposed to like live out your dreams? If it's not your 30s? Why not do


Andrew Keller

that? Well, I think it's because I didn't do it that way. So you can't do it that way, either. I mean, that used to be you worked for 40 years, you got a gold watch. And you died three weeks after you retired? Because that's just what you did. And I think maybe the boomer generations a little bit different. I think the average person has five career changes or something like that. And now, it's like if especially in tech, if you don't change every if you don't change jobs every 18 months. That's like you're stagnant. So I don't know, I think this is a paradigm shift. I've said it so many times before this, everyone's like working from home is not possible. And when you're forced to do it, you're like, well, you have to look at a different light and just saying, let's go back to 100%. What we were I don't think is going to be what's best for everyone involved.


Larry

I'm saying you read the tea leaves, you're 28 years old, you've made a boatload of money. You've been stuck at home for a year, you've got nothing tying you down. Why would you not quit everything and go travel


Andrew Keller

to your three year? I mean, even boatload is a subjective number. I mean, if you take the amount of money you made out of the equation, even if you even if you don't have that much money, you can figure out a way to travel, like, you don't need to be a billionaire. You don't even need to be a multimillionaire to be able to do it. You could just there's ways to make it happen like this. People have been forced to look at their lives and say, well, what's what's important to me is going to an office 40 hours a week just to get FaceTime important, or can I make a little bit less money and do something that I want to do?


Larry

Which I think once again, read this article at times, I feel like they're skeptical of these 28 year olds, taking a look at their life after a year and doing some introspection, and then being like, I don't want to do this anymore. I'm gonna do something different. And I was like, good for you. In the last year, you did some introspection.


Andrew Keller

I mean, it's not only 28 year olds, you're in your 40s. I'm in my 30s. We were doing this. It's not like well, the pandemics over this. I mean, I don't know if he would call this a side hustle. But it's work on the side that we kind of own the content of and we're not doing it for someone else. Are you going to quit and go back to your full time normal?


Larry

Well, and that's the other thing. You read these articles about? YOLO and life and side hustles? It's It's always like all or nothing? Isn't there? Like an in between? Can't you do like a side hustle and maybe keep your job or get? Why does it have to be like I quit everything. And I only did this alright, middle Kip, there'll be like a middle ground.


Andrew Keller

Sometimes there can some jobs won't let you. I mean, I think there should be a middle job middle ground. But I remember the last company I worked for they had something technically in their employee handbook that said no moonlighting without approval, and is right when Uber started, and I was like, I'm gonna drive Uber and I did it at night. And they're like, you can't do that. I was like, fire me?


Larry

Well, no, and that's one of the things in this article. They say that like, companies like Twitter and Facebook, the big companies are trying to keep these young people and not having them quit and leave go forever. So even if you don't work one of those companies Can't you go to your boss be like, Hey, man, I'm sort of unhappy. We got to work something out so that I can only work part time and get another job. I feel like if you went to your boss and told him his actuation, there might be a way to work that out.


Andrew Keller

Yeah. And I think there's also something with the younger generation, in general, has less responsibility. You used to get married, when you're 18 1920, you start having kids, when you're 21, you don't have the luxury of going to your boss and say, I want to do something different. Because if you go and have that conversation, there is a chance they're gonna be like, now you got to go. And so I think the the millennials, I don't even know if there's a name for the next generation, the people that are in high school now, there's got to be, but it's either more willing to take a risk, I'm more willing to take a risk what's going on with kids. And I'm, I'm willing to do that, because if I had kids, I'd probably be less risk available.


Larry

I am very pro YOLO. I read this article, and I thought everybody was skeptical. I'm very pro yellow, except for I read an interesting article in Vanity Fair about Tony Shea, the founder of Zappos, who basically got everything in his life that he wanted, he started, Zappos became a billionaire, because Amazon bought them he traveled, he ran Las Vegas, there was all sorts of thing. And you know what, he ended up dying in his house, because he lit it on fire. It's like it going on a trip around the world, starting your own company, making ultimate amounts of money. All of that stuff, ultimately, will not make you happy. It won't cure your heart of all that you want in life, if you're doing it for experiences, but don't think that you know what, you're going to come back and be a completely centered person.


Andrew Keller

Yeah, I mean, to be clear, there's no straight line into making a lot of money and killing yourself. Richard Branson, made a boatload of money, and now he goes windsurfing with presidents when they retire. So there's ways to do it, but also YOLO. So weird saying that. It's a it's a concept. And for me, it's like, the most successful people are the ones that took a chance Richard Branson dropped out of high school and continued with a side hustle, he did turn that into an empire, Mark Zuckerberg, I mean, so many tech people dropped out of college doing a side hustle, and now they've hit it. But you have to also say that sometimes it doesn't work out, I think probably more times than not, it doesn't. So that's something to consider as well


Larry

in working out. What does that even mean to write this article goes on to say like, is Elon Musk a happy person? No, he takes drugs to go to bed at night is jack Dorsey. He starves himself on a dime. Mark Zuckerberg, has half the people on Facebook, he wakes up going, like, how do we get half the rest of the world on Facebook? They're not necessarily fulfill people, they're just successful at their job. So what is success for you? Like? Do you need to go travel around the world? Get that out of your system? So you've come back and have a family? Like, what is it that I mean, that's the whole point of late 20s, to figure out who you are.


Andrew Keller

Yeah, and I already did travel around the world. And I came back and I was still confused. I mean, there's people who were working three jobs at CVS that take an Ambien to go to sleep. So I mean, again, there's, there's no direct correlation, I think, just because you have money, you're not going to be happy. And just because you don't have money, you're you're not gonna be happy. There's a study and the numbers probably change some but the US they found that I think, if you make over $70,000 a year, you don't get an increase in your overall happiness. There's like a number where if you're in poverty, like it's hard, and things suck, but like, once you start making more and more and more and more, there's no direct, there's diminishing returns on what you can do.


Larry

I think the one thing this article was missing was just the idea of having community in your life, people that you can go to and say like, Hey, I'm miserable. What should I do people that will tell you the hard truth. And I think that's ultimately what I found, like after doing the thing in the 20s, in the 30s, like just having people that are really real in your life. That is what matters, not the traveling, not the money. It's like true friendships and family relationships. Nice. Well,


Andrew Keller

if you're ready for a hard conversation, please reach out Larry will respond. You can find him at reposting podcast on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, I'm Andrew Keller for the uncomfortable conversation. Thanks for stopping by.


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