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We’ve engineered movement out of our life.


Andrew

This is re posted. Every


Andrew Keller

morning, Larry and I dig into a form or idea that has caught our eye. Our hope is that our chat inspires you to never stop thinking and possibly challenges you in a new way. If you'd like to help support the show, please visit patreon.com slash reposted. Thank you for stopping by.


Larry

We are going to wrap up our Michael Easter series from his book that Andrew brought into my life. The comfort crisis, it's just so good. Here's today's quote from Mr. Easter, a century ago to live was essentially to have put an effort to life. Most jobs at the time, around 85% of them required a lot of manual labor. And now I only think 10% to we've sort of engineered movement out of our life. Moving is now really uncomfortable. Mr. Easter sort of says modern comforts and conveniences are tied to some of society's most pressing problems today, obesity, chronic disease, depression and a general lack of meaning. Is there anybody that doesn't think today's modern comforts lead to some of those things, Andrew?


Andrew Keller

For sure, I think movement isn't is is a huge piece of it. Also the way the food we eat is so different. Someone shared a picture on Facebook, a mobile, they use Facebook, and it was a picture of the beach from the 70s. And it was so crowded, and everyone else or everyone in the picture was like fit. And it was because they didn't have the processed foods and stuff. And I mean, that's clearly a modern convenience. Yeah, I mean, what we're doing right now doesn't require any effort, we're sedentary.


Larry

Um, so it gives us great example of a book, we don't like to be hungry, that used to make sense when there wasn't enough food around because it would really drive us to eat. And when we would eat, we would be rewarded with a shot of dopamine, the feel good can have chemical in our brain. But now we live in this sea of processed foods and always have food to eat. So that starts to work against us.


Andrew Keller

Yeah, I think it's an interesting flip because and whatever century before this royalty or wealth being obese as a sign of being rich, because you you were able to eat whenever you wanted. And now it's flipped. Obesity is generally associated with poverty. And the rich have personal trainers and personal chefs and cooks felt


Larry

another great quote, I'll just keep running out here, Americans now spend 93% of our time indoors in climate control. From time to time we talk about going out in nature, or doing something out of your comfort zone to make you sort of feel alive. Is that something Americans? Most people we know don't do.


Andrew Keller

Uh, I mean, I think what people are drawn to is, is like, regionally, I remember growing up, just in Texas, I feel like you You drive to the restaurant, you're outside for 45 seconds, you go from your car to inside, and you park in your garage, and you go, like, I've found though, but like in California, more people I've encountered are more willing to be outside, probably because of the weather. But it's like, you're you're moving around more. So I think it's both of those things. But I don't know, I think the climate controlled and all this sedentary stuff is is rough. I don't know what I'm gonna do different. But I like to think that I will.


Larry

So I kind of get the idea that I'm getting a little bit older. And I can't really do like the physical challenges, that sort of used to challenge I feel like those are a little bit easier, because it's just physical. But in his book, he says you learn something about yourself by putting yourself in a position of discomfort, almost to the point of where you feel like you're going to quit it right. Now we're getting a little bit older. That's why I say the physical challenges, but can we still challenge ourselves to do things? And then the sense look back and know that Oh, that was good for us?


Andrew Keller

I mean, I think so it depends on a personality thing. Like I think Yeah, go ahead and just do something and you'll feel a sense of accomplishment. You said earlier about how our brains get dopamine when we would eat we also get it when we work out and so like, people don't have to work out and so you don't get this feeling but I mean, it's it's almost hitting yourself hitting you over the head with how good it is for you to work out because the way you feel after. So it's like, we know that it's good for us, but we we don't do it anyway.


Larry

I don't know I'm not sure when you gave me this quote earlier this week with Michael Easter in his book if you knew that I was gonna get so excited about it. I have this tradition in the middle of week I have to drop a kid off at soccer practice. It's near the beach, so I usually don't run and I have to go run on the beach and this week it has been howling in the Bay Area like so incredibly windy, so I get to the beach and I like to run on this on the near the beach I've run actually in the sand to get a better workout. And if you run on the beach when it's windy, it's just like getting pelted with daggers, right? Because the winds just totally kicking the sand up. And it was just an insane day. I was like, No, I'm not gonna do this. And then I was like, wait a minute, this is exactly what Michael Easter's talking about. Go do something that you don't want to do and see how it feels. And man did I feel literally I felt alive like like the only like, beaches are pretty packed. Most of the time. It was a sunny day was windy. I was the only person out there just trudging along on the beach. And I'll tell you what, I was like I did it. I feel alive.


Andrew Keller

Yeah, well, Michael Easter says do that. I also say take a cold shower. That's something you don't want to do. And I will attest you feel alive after it's over. And as someone that hasn't had a working shower for over a week, I know. It's something I miss.


Larry

Um, he says this, let me just read this quote, because I think it's great. We're programmed to get into routine because it saves brain power, it's a lot more comfortable to do the same thing every single day and live these days, that all sort of blend together, we tend to go into autopilot. So figuring out ways to get out of that do new things forces you to be present and aware of what's happening in your life. Because your brain doesn't know what to anticipate, when it's a brand new experience. It can also slow down your sense of time, which is why it seemed a lot slower when you were a kid. It's because you were constantly doing new things. Yeah.


Andrew Keller

Have you considered Have you ever done an audio book before? Maybe you could narrate this book and send it into Michael Easter and say, Hey,


Larry

here's your book. I love it. I like this idea of doing new things. I think what he's trying to say is maybe in perfect games, like when you do new things that sort of gives you a timeline of what to remember, right? If we're doing the same thing every day, he mentioned that bleeds all together. So if you go on a crazy hike, or you do some crazy fitness challenge, it gives you a little pop in your timeline. So you can kind of remember things a little bit better.


Andrew Keller

Yeah, when you have something out of the ordinary out of your teen it stands out. I mean, for some reason, I keep knocking on the show. But we do this every day. And I'll random text from someone be like, hey, I'd like X, Y and Z. I'm like, I don't remember talking about that, because we do it every day. There's so much content, which is kind of going against his point. But that out there is something different.


Larry

So I mentioned earlier in the week that I read the excerpts of this book and immediately went put something on Amazon that I wanted to buy. And it has to do with this Michael Easter going on a caribou hunt. He puts himself he goes to the Arctic to do get out of his comfort zone. He goes and hunts caribou. And he goes in this long sort of researched bait. Find that man human beings were designed to travel long distances to track animals. Let the animals run themselves to death so that then we could pick them up, put them on our back, and then walk to wherever we were that were dissolved bodies are literally designed to do this, that we're not designed to run my marathons and all these other things because we get hurt a lot easier. So his whole point is that what we need is more rocks in our life. And there's a whole Navy SEAL guy who's designed these camps. To wear you wear ruck sacks, you put 60 pounds on you. And walking with 60 pounds for 30 minutes is way better than running for an hour and a half. So I went on Amazon and I now three days later, I purchased 40 pounds so that I could put it on my body vest and wear it when I go on walks.


Andrew Keller

Why don't you just take 20 pounds off of it you said 60 pounds is the number now you're like I'm 40


Larry

Well, I'm only gonna do I'm starting at 40 I have the option to go more I don't want to I don't want to you know, wreck myself I'm going to start at 40 but as I go on these walks around my neighborhood, I'm carrying a rucksack bra.


Andrew Keller

Wow, that's exciting. I think we should check in in a month and see what what changes you notice if at any


Larry

I'll put it in my calendar. You got to put it in your calendar and see if I'm rocking.


Andrew Keller

Yeah, see if you're gonna resolve you have well if you want to slip into one at Larry's rucksack pockets, please reach out. Find us at repost it podcast on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Larry has his rucksack on



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