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We are never bored anymore.


Andrew Keller

Hey everybody, this is Episode 300. And in honor of that we are taking a clip from the movie 300. Please enjoy this.


Every morning, Larry and I dig into a book or idea that has caught our eye. Our hope is that our chat inspires you to never stop thinking and possibly challenges you in a new way. If you'd like to help support the show, please visit patreon.com slash reposted. Thank you for stopping by. I was bored the other day and I was watching Joe Rogan on YouTube. I like watching him and clips because unlike some people, I can't listen to him on two and a half speed to make him more digestible. Anyway, he had a guest named Michael Easter who has a book out called the comfort crisis. And basically, in this clip I was watching he was saying we are never bored anymore. When you have a moment of solitude or inactivity, you go for your phone. And I'm guilty of that sometimes. And I was primarily interested in this because I don't think that's you. I think you're the exception to this rule. But maybe you think differently. What's a you


Larry

in the history of our show, I have never been researching a topic and immediately went and bought something. I didn't actually buy it. I put it in the Amazon cart. I'm gonna give it three days. But I immediately bought something. This is such a great topic. This guy Michael is fascinating. And he literally says be bored. That's how you get out of your comfort zone is by being bored.


Andrew Keller

What did you What did you put his book?


Larry

I know I didn't buy his book. I knew you're gonna say that. No, I didn't buy his book. I'll tell you at the end what I bought a clip. But this idea of being bored. And there's all sorts of studies that say being bored makes you creative.


Andrew Keller

Yeah. Also, they talk about how, when we were on the Serengeti, it was a survival technique. Like you're picking berries and you get bored of it because like there becomes less and less like, Alright, I need to move on. I think the most obvious reason is creativity. And even if you work as a CPA, you need creativity in your life. And I think it's also a defense mechanism. Sometimes if I'm waiting for someone, I feel uncomfortable, I feel it's weird to to stand there. And I feel like I'm important. I need to look at my phone. There's some message I need to get to now and people use as a shield. I don't think you answered do you do this? I don't think you do.


Larry

I kind of vacillate but I definitely make myself consciously be bored and not look at the phone. Like for instance, if I go to the grocery store, and there's a long line, I will say okay, we're gonna do this board style and not looking at the phone style. It just stand there and look at things.


Andrew Keller

Yeah, it's, it's crazy. And then like, I remember just in the summer growing up, I'd be like, I'm bored. And my mom was always putting me in camps are all of us in camps and stuff. But like we would find, one of the most engaging things I remember doing is when it would rain, we would do stick races in the gutter. And that was so fun. I don't think kids would do that. Now. Would you notice stick races then?


Larry

Of course. I'm one of the things though about being bored is that you know, we all get sad, depressed, anger, all these emotions come to us. But instead of sitting with those, we then click on the phone, read something watch a Netflix show. But all of those emotions are still there, and you're not dealing with them. If you're bored, you have to wrestle with the thoughts that are in your head instead of doing something.


Andrew Keller

Yeah, I don't know if I've told you the story before. But one of the most uncomfortable moments of my life, I was aware enough not to pull out my phone. I was in a club with Nicole for a work event. And she had rented out a private section for 30 people and we had to get there first and she had to go downstairs and wait for people. The club was completely packed except our section. We had a bouncer and I was sitting in this corner couch and everyone's looking at me like who is this guy? I was like, I'm never gonna be in this situation again. I need to just embrace how awkward it is. And I appreciated that but it's really hard to do.


Larry

There's this great story of dick cheney during 911 Vice President Dick Cheney, do the planes but they don't really know what's going on the plane still trying to stop air traffic control. The President is far away. So he's essentially kind of the President. And they have to rush him to the Panic Room. They have to rush the vice president Panic Room. Like you got to get down there, sir. We don't know what's going on. And like there is like, Oh, crap, I forgot my magazine. He didn't want to be bored in the breakout room. So he's like he had to bring his reading material to not be bored and that's me. Like, I try to bring some reading material wherever I go. Wait to wait for my daughter's COVID test the other day it was like 20 minutes and I brought my vanity fair. Like I am extremely like when I go on an airplane. I bring like two books and bag And like five downloaded shows, I don't want to be bored. I want to be entertained.


Andrew Keller

Yeah, being on a plane or being in car trips was the worst I anytime I have it like I remember being in car trips and we had entertainment my parents had this conversion van that had TV in it and we were entertained somewhat, but not like it is today where you have an iPad, but I think about my mom when she was young. She and her family drove from Louisiana to Los Angeles with six people in a car. I think it was seven, there was three of front and four in the bag. No air conditioner, no radio. I can't imagine doing that. That's gonna be mind numbing. But there's


Larry

but so were their brains trained to just be bored. Like my kids today could obviously sit for an eight hour car ride, but they'd be in insane because they know that there's tablets to entertain them. But back 30 years ago, do we just like, well, there's nothing to do other than look out the window.


Andrew Keller

I mean, yeah, I guess growing up in a hot climate You don't know anything different in this is what it is like, there's not like the the torment of I could be on an iPad, and I'm not. But you just had to sit there and be creative. And you come up with silly games like the license plate game, or I spy or I mean different things. But it'll be interesting. I don't know if we'll be able to quantify it. But what happens moving forward with the amount of creative ideas that come out? Because if you're if you're always stimulated, you can't come up with something new Jerry Seinfeld talked about, we talked about him on the Tim Ferriss podcast, he's like, you just have to sit there and nothing comes out for 30 minutes, I have to sit at the computer 30 minutes every day.


Larry

Have you talked to like purist runners? They don't listen to anything when they run.


Andrew Keller

Like my brother doesn't listen to music,


Larry

like and that's like the I feel like they're saying like there's some mental part, as well as the physical part or running mental in that you can't be entertained, while you go through this long period of endurance.


Andrew Keller

Yeah. And also, it's important to know, you can't really do a substitution either, like, I'm not gonna be on my phone, you can't go watch TV, watch YouTube. Go on. I mean, sometimes I go on a walk, but I still listen to music, or I listen to podcasts. So I guess it was funny. They talked in the Joe Rogan thing about how they were knocking their own medium being like, Hey, don't listen to us anymore. But


Larry

it was, I thought it was funny. Yeah. Because when you do that, when you listen to something on a walk, you really are paying attention to the things that around you were supposed to if you have silence, you're like, I've never seen that manhole cover before, or that tree or whatever it is. And you can say, well, that's stupid. I don't want to care about that. But it's really amazing. If you just pay attention on a walk all this stuff you'll see.


Andrew Keller

Yeah, I mean, Nicole, and I go on a lot of walks, and whether you know it in the moment, I think just the more aware you are just more data points that you pick up, you're like, Oh, I like that color, or That's dangerous. And it's just things that kind of just seep into your subconscious. And whether you're gonna use it immediately or not like noticing stuff is helpful.


Larry

You know, we talked about this every once in a while we'll have like a john Muir quote about when you go camping, like when you go into the mountains, you don't typically bring you know, podcasts or TVs or whatever. So you're just sit there looking at trees for like few days.


Andrew Keller

Yeah. And it's nice. I remember camping one time we had no, this is so no cell phone service, nothing. We were in Rocky Mountain National Park for I think eight days, seven or eight days. And I remember I was going down to the creek to fill up my water bottle. And I was thinking I was like, there could be a World War right now. And I would have no idea. And that was kind of nice. That's a weird nice.


Larry

Thought I had. I sometimes think when I'm camping, like someone could come murder me in my tent in the middle of the night and nobody would know.


Andrew Keller

Yeah, well, to be fair, every time you tell me you're camping, I tried to find you and kill you. marathon cart.


Larry

So we're gonna have to talk about this again tomorrow. Because this guy's book, I forget the name of the book. It's something about getting out of your comfort crisis, embrace discomfort to recant claim your wild, happy, healthy self. Because the two topics he also talks about, think about so be bored. Think about your death a lot. That's another topic. And then there's another one about exercise. And I don't think it doesn't really have a relevance to what we're talking about today. But I literally would have bought this after prepping for this guy.


Andrew Keller

Oh, well. If you want to find out if Larry put a coffin in his Amazon cart, please reach out and find us every posted podcast on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram. If you're gonna stay on social media share this with someone. But if not, listen to Michael Easter and I'm Andrew for Larry. Thanks for stopping by.



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