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Sell yourself first, if you want to sell anything. - Burt Lancaster


Andrew

This is re posted.


Hello, and welcome to repost it. In the next few moments we'll be breaking down the posts that we have found to be inspiring, interesting, or otherwise entertaining quotes that catch our eye and we feel are worth a deeper look. Thank you for stopping by.


Larry

Hello there, Andrew. We are going to wrap up our sales series. Some people didn't even know that we were in a sales series nonetheless. We're gonna wrap it up anyways with a quote from Burt Lancaster. sell yourself first. If you want to sell anything. I like there, Frank. First of all, what's your favorite Burt Lancaster movie?


Andrew

It was called neighbor next door.


Larry

Okay, very good.


Andrew

36 is directed by art Hornbuckle?


Larry

I was gonna go with Devil's disciple, but I like yours, too. You know, I'd like to kind of frame it in a talk of to Burt Lancaster, CO. You're an actor in Hollywood? Was Leonardo DiCaprio? Did he do the best job of selling himself? Or did he sell the art that he did? Was he just a better actor than everybody else? Or did he sell himself better than anybody else?


Andrew

I don't know if I've ever said it on this show. But the thing I say most about acting, but I guess it applies to the arts in general, the most talented actors are not the most successful actors. most successful actors are the ones that are the best at running the business of them. You're the CEO of you. And so if you have the best product, but no one is selling it, then you aren't going to be successful.


Larry

Having said that, Leonardo DiCaprio, George Clooney are really good actors.


Andrew

Right? You have to you have to be good. Like, I could be the best salesman ever, and try to sell you on buying stock in Friendster. But it's not like it's not it doesn't exist. It's like the, the quality isn't there. So when I first read this, I think the way you're framing it is you have to be able to sell yourself to other people. But I think the most important thing you need to do first is sell yourself to yourself. Like if you don't believe that you're good. And you walk into a room, people gonna be able to read that. I mean, what we talked about with chip it earlier the sales series is your job in sales is creating moments of truth. So if you don't believe in you, as an actor, what you're selling or the product that you're selling, it's going to become clear, pretty early on.


Larry

Okay, so, under that auspice every time you go out, perform improv or do a reading? Do you always feel like you're worthy of whatever role you're auditioning for whatever you're doing?


Andrew

I think I do every time I've auditioned in the last I've been here for five years, every in the last two or three years, every single time I leave the room. I'm like, I booked it. I'm convinced it really, and as you know, 99% of time. But I mean, you have to think that you're going to and it's I'm kind of viewing it pragmatically, as a numbers game, like, there's an infinite number of people that want the role. And you have it or you don't and having been on the other side of it, it's not necessarily. There's so many factors that go and you can't think about those things.


Larry

And that's my point, like, in a true audition for a role. The casting director, are they looking for a particular type of view? Or are they going like, Hey, man, I'm really just gonna look at the work that that person is doing and choose from that.


Andrew

I think it depends on who you talk to. If you talk to a casting director, they'll say, I'm open to seeing anything, we want to find the next whatever. But I think from my perspective, having been on both sides of it, they're in the business of not losing their job. I think across most industries, people are in the business of not losing their job. And they want to go with a known commodity, because the way it works is the casting director selects three to 10 options, and out of thousands, and they send it on to the producers and the producers make the decision. And if you send options to the producers, and they don't like any of them, they have to go through it again. And the producers like I don't want to work with this casting director again. So it's a long way to say that the casting directors are selling themselves and saying, here's a known commodity, and they reach out to a handful of people that they know and maybe they'll throw in one new one to see their audition, but they have a finite number of time, amount of time, they can't watch 204 minute auditions a day.


Larry

So when I read this quote, it made me realize that I have been doing my career completely wrong. Every single time I've gone for a job interview, I was trying to pitch myself on that job. What I should have been doing is making a case that I'm a specific person, and that I'm good for that job. I heard this podcast of a guy. I don't want an out him but he was going to become the president of an organization. And they were pitching him on becoming the President and this interview goes like I'm not right for this job. Because this is what I I want to do in my life, this this specific things, but I want to do, and they wanted them anyways, if you sell like if you, if you're giving whatever interviewee and I the wrong idea who you are, you're gonna get into that job and be miserable, it's not going to be a good fit. I feel like I was always selling the wrong idea. You have to sell exactly who you are. So that it's a good fit. And it's long. Anytime you do something short sighted. In the long run, it's it's gonna be fake and not work out.


Andrew

Yeah. And also, for the jobs that I've worked in, throw being qualified for the job out out the window, like, presumably everyone The interview is qualified. It's, do I want to spend 4030 to 60 hours a week with this person? And they say, for commercial auditions, a lot of times directors looking at do I want to spend 16 hours on set with this person? Like, are they going to be cool to hang out with like, you start with the baseline of everyone can do it. But like, like you said, selling yourself? Like, am I a cool person to hang out with? Or am I going to accomplish would be able to work within the team to be able to get done with everyone to get that.


Larry

And you know, just to back that up. That's what almost what Gary said membro in when he interviews people for his VC fund, and he's saying like, Hey, I actually go and fund people that I like, because on Friday night, when I'm taking care of my kids, I'm not going to take that call from a person who's got a problem with business. Like, I have to like really like that person to leave my family to give them advice. And he only you only do that if you make this connection and really like that person. So I think it's like, how do you bring that true, authentic self and not fake it which I feel like a lot of times actors are doing to build the right connection in anything you're doing, whether it's friendships, job, whatever it is.


Andrew

Yeah, one of the worst things do you are you familiar with the term being thirsty? Not no water? So it's like, if you come across really needy, you're like, Oh, I really want this Yeah. Hey, man, can you just like you've come across as thirsty. And I think that's one of the worst things that you can do. Like, you hear you want to differentiate yourself, you want to stand out, but sometimes you're just like, Hey, man, you put your hands up in there I am, who I am, you should want me if you don't, someone else does. And and most of the time, I think in the long run that's gonna serve you better than being like, how can I conform to what you want.


Larry

And I think that's like one of these great sales rules back to Kirk who started this thing off, it's like, you have to be able to walk away from a deal. Like, you have to be willing to be like, you know what, because if you're desperate, the other side's gonna get the best of you. If you're good with the position you're at, and it's a good and it makes sense, then you're not going to come off desperate.


Andrew

Yeah, one more acting thing, since we started off with me being and you're wearing glasses. So I'm wearing glasses and an infinity scarf is that a lot of times, you'll get for an acting role, say you're supposed to be a drug addicted dad who works on Wall Street, right? So you get these sides, and 99% of the people are going to do it a certain way. If that doesn't resonate with you, then it's not going to come across as authentic. You do it like Hey, man, this is how I want to do it. I do a good job. Maybe it fits within your system. Maybe it doesn't. But this is how I do it. And I think that's gonna set you up for more success is believing in yourself, like sell yourself to you.


Larry

I just don't only think about that. Right? What if the director you're trying to do what the director you're trying to get into the director's head and do it the way he would want it to be done? Isn't that acting?


Andrew

No, it's you're supposed to do a Well, I mean, you need to be able to take direction. But like you said, if you get into a job by misrepresenting like what is true to you, then it's not going to work in the acting. So it's like, this is my interpretation of Clark Wilson, who is the drug addicted stockbroker, if this doesn't work within your, your vision, I can fake something but doing it 30 times on set like isn't going to work. So believe like, and be like you said, Be willing to walk away be like, this doesn't work.


Larry

And just the last part of that too, is though, if you're truly being yourself in these roles, and you get rejected time after time, it's like they're rejecting literally you.


Andrew

Yeah, and that's something you have to be able to cope with and a lot of people can't. So there you go. If you want to ride on a private jet with Leo, please reach out. You can find us at repost it podcast on Facebook, Twitter, or Instagram. I'm Andrew Keller for $5 bills.


Transcribed by https://otter.ai


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