Search
  • Andrew Keller

Is nothing sacred anymore?


Andrew

This is re posted.


Andrew Keller

Every morning Larry and I dig into a form or idea that has caught our eye. Our hope is that our chat inspires you to never stop thinking and possibly challenges you in a new way. If you'd like to help support the show, please visit patreon.com slash reposted. Thank you for stopping by.


Larry

All right, Mr. Keller, we need more meatloaf in my life. Yes, meatloaf, not the dish but the singer from the 80s and 90s. We call we pull from his album Welcome to the neighborhood. The quote today is is nothing sacred anymore. I'm sure I didn't say that exactly the way he would have done it. Sacred comes from the word sacraments, which means a religious ceremonial ritual regarded as imparting divine grace. We know baptisms, Muslims had the Mecca is a sacred journey Jewish people celebrate Passover, Polynesians dance. But I also think sacraments are a lot less than that, like a sacrament of communion could just be dinner. sacrament of vocation is like your job, sacrament of marriage. You live that every single day, do you believe in this idea of sacred parts of days, months or years?


Andrew Keller

I mean, I think that there's benefit in having those things. But I think it's also not beneficial to hold on to it as if it's something that has to happen, like you need to be able to be flexible. For me, part of my routine is having coffee in bed and like talking to Nicole about the day about what's to come. And that's something sacred, but sometimes we don't do that. And that's fine. I think it's good to have those things. But I don't think it's necessarily something you have to do for your sanity, I think.


Larry

Yeah, I mean, so some people would argue that like, every Muslim has to go to Mecca at one particular point in their life, Jewish people sort of have to celebrate Passover. But I like the idea of that, you know, like I said, you could just break it down to a little thing is just wake it up and have a coffee in bed with your wife. I think that's a sacrament.


Andrew Keller

Yeah, but But again, I think it's something not to hold on to, I mean, people, Christian say, you have to go to church every Sunday, but sometimes you're not in town and or you're on a plane, like you can't do it is that can be the end of you. And if you hold on to something so tightly that you have to do it, then it makes your life you can be put putting yourself into a miserable situation. I know, do you have routines that you sit on your stoop every morning, you've moved? Do you walk to your old house and sign your stupid 5am


Larry

I'm sort of torn by this whole ritual thing, because I think it kind of comes down to religion again, because I think a lot of times, when you hear of people, Muslims that WOC, a mecca or Jewish people that celebrate these things, I think religious religions push us further apart. They kind of celebrate their clan, rather than bring us all together, but also to, I think, sacred, daily rituals monthly can also kind of break up the monotony of life, right? We get in, we get into doing our thing, and we sort of forget, oh, wait a minute, I just went 10 days and didn't take time to look up at the trees or celebrating anything. So I'm really kind of torn on this idea of having sacred moments. And also religion. Yes, I do have some things I do wake up, I try to welcome the date sort of a Native American tradition where I welcome the universe to me. You know, I was thinking about you. And I was thinking about your sacraments. crawfish boil is like really big in your family. That's something that's very sacred to your family that you guys, it's almost like you got to come back for it. Yeah, I


Andrew Keller

mean, I don't think I have missed an Easter weekend with my family in my life. My sister's only missed one. And my brother may be a couple because he was in the Navy. But yeah, I mean, that is a big part of our lives, you were saying that maybe making it part of your routine breaks up the monotony of your life. But I would argue that if you make it part of your routine, then that becomes the monotony of your life. I think treating things that are special as if they're sacred is maybe more beneficial to you like, noticing a tree is more beneficial than being like, Alright, it's Wednesday, I got to go notice trees. I mean, ever, every personality is going to handle these things differently. But for me, having to put it on a calendar is going to make it less sacred.


Larry

Yeah, that's true. But you know, just the monotony of stuff, right? I mean, dinner is communion. And we try to have a, I was thinking about this a long time ago with my kids, that they do not experience silence all day long. The first moment of silence that they have is this sort of sacrament, little ceremony that we had before dinner where we just have a moment of silence. And you could make it religious or I was like, wait a minute, that's the maybe that's maybe the only 60 seconds of silence my kids will have all day long. So I was trying to combine a couple of things. So it can be like a big thing or it could just be a little thing, I think, and I think both of those things are great ideas. You know, what do you think make something sacred? What's the? What could you do? Or what makes something a sacred idea?


Andrew Keller

I'm going to answer that. I have one quick question. After your 60 seconds of silence you pour one out for your homies.


Larry

We do not pull one out, by the way, depending on who the Joker is, sometimes it's like two minutes. So it'll be like, you don't want to hold everybody hostage. I don't. I don't, I'm always I'm not in charge of the moment of silence we rotate it. So the young rascal might be like, Hey, we're gonna go five minutes. He says sit there silence


Andrew Keller

like that. Well, maybe tonight, you can pour one out for your homie Andrew. What's your question?


Larry

What makes up let's make something sacred.


Andrew Keller

I think it's the people's viewpoint of it, or how you hold it sacred. It's it's not the actual act. I don't think doing something is necessarily sacred. It's how humans react to it. Like a funeral can be held sacred. I mean, the things as we've been talking about thinking about is like a birth and death is something that people hold pretty sacred, because it's like, moving in and out of life. But you could have a funeral and your most hated enemy could come and and be very disrespectful to you and then it becomes less sacred. So I think it's just how you how humanity or how people treat it.


Larry

Can you make anything sacred? Like even going down to like a workout workouts are sacred to people? Oh, for sure.


Andrew Keller

I mean, I know people that's a huge deal to them is like, this is my time, and it's very sacred to them. So yeah, I mean, I think anything can be sacred. If you hold it in high regard to your to, to you and you make it important.


Larry

I was just gonna say I think sacred things are things you hold important one of our I This might sound stupid or not, but one of the sacred things in the Olsen house is Tahoe. Lake Tahoe is very serious to us in that it's like a time capsule of our life. You know, we go to different places for vacation, we do different things. But every year in summer, we go to Thailand, we take pictures, right? So we've got to see the snapshot of every single person, we've gotten to see the different levels of the lake, we have the same traditions. Like it's a sacred thing for us because it really kind of it's like a time capsule of all that we've done so I know that seems silly. It's silly. tacos are sick sacred spot spot, but it really is.


Andrew Keller

I mean, I think it is but going back to what I said at the beginning is like one day your entire family won't be a taco and your ability to like deal with that is is something that's like, that should be okay. My family went to Pensacola or the panhandle Florida every year for my entire life. And about six or seven years ago, we stopped doing that. So like it was every single summer we would go to Pensacola or destined or Gulf Shores. And that was a great time capsule my life but like I've moved past it. And I think my point. It's not very profound, but it's like, yes, something sacred, and it's held important to you, but also be able to let it go and understand for what it was in the past. Kind of negative Nancy, but


Larry

I like to so the idea someone's imparted on me is like inviting others into your sacred practices. So like when we invite someone, someone comes to Tahoe, it's like a big deal, because that's kind of like our secret place. So I like this idea of sharing sort of something intimate, intimate with someone you want in your circle.


Andrew Keller

Yeah, like that time I went to Tahoe with you that was


Larry

well, you've never come you have you your your big time given here is my last question. Is my last question. Is there is there a difference between sacred and superstitious like you do something just because you think you have to do it? Because bad things will happen to you?


Andrew Keller

I think it's a fine line. But I think it's very different.


Larry

But I mean, do you think people sometimes confuse those two like, regularly?


Andrew Keller

I mean, I've taught my head it seems like someone with OCD might confuse those things regularly or maybe a baseball player having to do his gloves eight times before each pitch might be different. So sacred and superstitious.


Larry

Joe boo Joe boo from Yes, I get that.


Andrew Keller

Yeah. Well, if you want to talk to Nolan, Ryan, please reach out. You can find us at repost a podcast on Facebook, Twitter or Instagram. I mean to tell us that a town drums and thanks for stopping by




0 views0 comments

Recent Posts

See All