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Guest Woniya Thibeault - Buckskin Revolution


This is re posted.


Hello, and welcome to reposted. In the next few moments we'll be breaking down the posts that we have found to be inspiring, interesting, or otherwise entertaining quotes that catch our eye and we feel are worth a deeper look. Thank you for stopping by. Today we're joined by Wanda T. Bo from buckskin revolution. She has dedicated decades to devotion and practicing and teaching ancestral skills and other skills that support a Wilder and more land based lifestyle. You can check out buckskin revolution calm, you can also find buckskin revolution on YouTube and Instagram, check out a month Patreon to give some support. Thank you so much for joining us today.


Woniya Thibeault

Yeah, my pleasure. Thanks for having me.


Andrew

I wanted to start out with what you have. on your website, you say I'm always striving to find the best balance between living a well rounded primal human life and staying plugged in enough with the modern world. And I think that's really interesting. And I wish more people did it. But can you talk more about what you're striving to accomplish?


Woniya Thibeault

Yeah, absolutely. You know, it's it's morphed a lot throughout my lifetime, when I first got into these skills, I just really, you know, wanted to, like run naked into the wilderness and never come back, and had very much like the more Stone Age living as my ideal. And it was incredibly isolating, right, because we're these very social creatures, we evolved as pack animals and social creatures. And we're not actually supposed to be doing the stuff on our, on our own. And also, you know, now it's really important to me not just to be practicing these skills, and this lifestyle, but also to be be sharing it with others and be a source of inspiration so that folks don't feel completely trapped in the modern lifestyle, and without any other alternatives. And so in that way, it feels important to me to be a bridge between those worlds and still be able to be in touch with folks and be able to teach and, and share these skills with people who, you know, are in all kinds of situations, and it might be an apartment building and a skyscraper in New York City. But there's still ways that they can integrate elements of a walkable lifestyle and connection with a natural world, into into their life. And so that's really my mission. And, you know, having that be my mission has looked like a lot more computer time for me recently. So it's a poignant quote from my website, because these days, the balance has swung too far to the more modern and plugged in for just me myself. So I'm so I'm both trying to be a demonstration of that balance, and actually, actively try and find more of that balance in my personal life right now.


Larry

I tried to wear my most adventury type clothes, and that turned into a tank top today, so to impress you, but probably not. But no, we have. We have bingo squares for terms that we use all the time on the reposts podcast, one of those being back when we live on the Serengeti, you know, the original human being made things with his hands cut trees down killed things for dinner, is that person still in us? Like, I binge watch TV shows? I talk about myself on social media, we chickens that were processed in plants, but is that original person still in us?


Woniya Thibeault

Yeah, that's a great question. And and my belief is very much Yeah, the reason why our bodies look like they do the reason the reason we have these amazing hands that are capable of so much of the reasons our nervous systems are wired the way they are, is because of those primal roots and the ways that shaped us. And, you know, that shaped us for millions of years. And it's been a couple 100 years that we've had the lifestyle more like you described, evolution takes a really long time. So absolutely, those primal humans and habits and proclivities are still very much in us. And we can develop those, you know, they're kind of hidden, they're under the radar now, but there are ways that we can develop and bring them out. And that's that's my work is reminding folks that they all have that capacity, and also giving practical skills and habits and you know, practices that you can build into your lifestyle to feel more in touch with those deeper parts.


Andrew

So I saw on your website, you offer a course in connecting in survival skill, like you said, also like helping up and people in like New York or in a skyscraper figure out how to be connected like, what does that look like? It could be anywhere from city slickers where you go out on if you've seen that movie, but Billy Crystal they do the cattle drive like that's kind of the the comical application of it, but like, how could someone Larry lives in San Francisco, I'm in Los Angeles, how do we get out of the city and get our hands dirty when we can't leave our our life we have in the city?


Woniya Thibeault

Yeah, well, that's exactly what that course is about. It's so the idea being that you know, even in our modern human places, and even in an urban areas, there's nature all around. We just need to shift our thinking about it from like, oh, the only way that I can really connect with nature is a deep wilderness immersion. To You know, can I connect with the clouds overhead in on the balcony of my apartment? Or the plant life in the potted plant, you know, in in my house or, you know, there's always some way to plug in, and some are easier, and some are more accessible. But we all have that. And we can also, you know, we can do short forays out into the wild and, you know, learn to harvest some foods and then have those in our diet in a more regular way. And just the the old adage that you are what you eat is still really true. So like finding those little ways that we can more easily incorporate the wild into our lives. That's, that's part of what I'm after, so that it isn't all or nothing.


Larry

One of the things you say people get when they come hang out with you in a forest for the weekend, is that you help them form habits, what happens to people form when they go out for in nature for a week, a weekend with you?


Woniya Thibeault

Yeah, well, and honestly, these days, I'm doing a lot of online teaching. So it's not even being out in nature with me, it's watching me on a screen, you know, like, like we're doing right now. But, but some some habits are what we call a sit spot, like just choosing a spot that you go out, and you sit every day, if possible, or a few times a week, and you just recalibrate your senses to taking in information and a whole bunch of different ways. And starting to be a little bit more aware of birdsong and what the weather's doing and what small plants are growing from the ground and starting to retune our awareness. That's a huge thing, because we evolved with all of these senses to take in information and a lot of ways. But now our senses are mostly all directed forward and visually, because we spend so much time staring at a screen. So that's one habit is, you know, broadening even the focus of your eyes and opening your ears and starting to take in all of this information. And that keeps us more present. It's similar to a meditation practice and getting us into a part of our brain. That's a healthier, more natural part of our brain than this super, you know, constant squirrel cage, like, oh, what's my to do list? And what am I having for dinner, and you know, when are my taxes due, and all of that stuff. That is that's stressful and damaging to our nervous system. And so, every way that we allow ourselves to drop back into the present moment and use our senses, those are helpful habits that start to ripple out and affect all kinds of things in our life.


Unknown Speaker

You


Andrew

You were with hide tanning, boxing, clothing, wild foods, medicine, fiber arts, basketry, wilderness living skills, like all these things, do you have a favorite? I know what, like what I would be drawn to but like, when you sit down and you start doing basketry you're like, yes, this is my favorite or, like, what gets you excited about being in the wilderness?


Woniya Thibeault

Yeah, I mean, hide tanning has been a huge passion of mine for a long time. And there's something to me really, really magical about the process because it's so transformative. It's so alchemical, you go from this, like, you know, frankly, kind of gnarly, nasty, stinky, dead animal skin. And the process is a little bit stinky, and you turn it into the most amazing material on earth rate. And leather is like just incredible. smells incredible. It's beautiful. It's more durable than any other leather and way more durable than any cloth. So getting to getting to take part in that process connects you to the deer connects you to the human ancestors, because tanning hides in this way is what allowed us to leave the Serengeti as you as your reference, you know, like we evolved in Equatorial climates, and now we live all over the globe. And that is because we learned to tan leather. So to me, the hide tanning is really, really connective on so many different levels. And it's also really physical, it's really, you know, difficult. And so it really pushes the body and gets us into our bodies. And yeah, I just I love hide tanning and sewing with skin. So that's been a specialty of mine and definitely one of my passions, but also the wild foods, there's something about being out in the wild harvesting plants and, and and, you know, hunting as well. That also just really it it just speaks to a place in my DNA that remembered what it was like to be intimately connected and dependent on the world around me. So wild foods are a huge passion as well.


Larry

All right, we would be remiss if we did not ask you at least one question about your appearance. On the reality TV show alone, you spent 100 days in the wilderness. My question is How real is this stuff? I see. I see amazing race. I see survivor. like are they really letting you live alone in the wilderness for 100 days? Are they like, Hey, you want a granola bar?


Woniya Thibeault

So So a couple things there. So I wasn't out for 100 days. The last season was 100 day challenge and only one person on the history of the show has gone as long as 100 days. But also they don't call it reality TV they call it unscripted television because most reality TV as you say is in fact fake. And the only reason why I did alone is because I do consider it the most you know the the only real legitimate show of this kind out there. It's absolutely 100% real they drop you in the wilderness with the 10 items you've chosen to be there And they do medical checks, which, you know, they let folks know that occasionally they do medical checks, but no, there's no one there with granola bars behind the cameras. I mean, you're doing all of the filming yourself, you are literally 100% alone out there with a bunch of cameras and you know, a few tools and staying out there as long as you can. So, yeah, it's it's totally legit. And that's part of what makes it so unique and why I was willing to do it. You know, I've been doing this stuff for a long time. So I've been contacted by a lot of these, quote, reality shows, and getting more into the process. I'm like, Oh, well, that's not real. And I'm not doing a thing that claims to be real, but isn't. But let alone is. It's totally legit.


Andrew

Yeah, I watched your season and it looks legit. I was on season four master chef. And that is not real. Very produced.


Woniya Thibeault

Yeah, right. Yeah, most of them are most of these shows are for sure. And anytime you have a camera person, it's automatically going to change things. Right? So but when you're just out for you know, weeks on end, nothing but you and the camera like all of your filters drop and and you're not you stop being as aware of the camera. So it's really just you living your life out there where as soon as you're an object in front of a camera that shifts everything.


Andrew

Well, one Nia t bo, thank you so much for joining us guys. Check out buckskin revolution calm. He's always doing Instagram Live. Check them out, give her a follow. Thank you so much for joining us today. I'm Andrew for Larry amonia t Bo's and thanks for stopping by




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