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Guest Nick Uhas - Is everyone ready to play with fire?


Unknown Speaker

This is re posted.


Andrew Keller

Every morning Larry and I dig into a form or idea that has caught our eye. Our hope is that our chat inspires you to never stop thinking and possibly challenges you in a new way. If you'd like to help support the show, please visit patreon.com slash reposted. Thank you for stopping by. Nick you hos is a science influencer producer and host of the Netflix show blown away. Nick has a YouTube channel that it's all about learning by doing his videos include the world record elephant toothpaste, liquid sand pool and giant baking soda rockets name a few. You go to youtube.com slash Nick you ha so you can find him on Instagram, Twitter or tik tok at Nick you hos thanks for joining us today, Nick.


Unknown Speaker

Yeah, man. Yeah,


Unknown Speaker

I was. I was gonna say we have to address and it looks like you're driving to work. But I doubt that it's what you're doing because I can see cars moving. Yeah, I find you.


Andrew Keller

Yeah, we're, I'm in the car. We're self driving. I'm on my way into the studio. Probably by the time we finish this, I will be inside the studio. So I guess kind of maybe the situation I'm in right now goes well, with the quote, we want to start you off with you said on the show blown away? Is everyone ready to play with fire? I think that's great. Because your science background fires, the combustion which substances combined through chemically reacting with oxygen. But like in hosting and doing your being an influencer. And just in life, being ready to play with fire, being ready to adapt is something you need to be able to do. I mean, you said it in a different context. But what does this mean for you and your career and your life? And anything?


Unknown Speaker

I mean, and Wow. So basically, anything in entertainment in general, is kind of like that same type of psychological preparation of playing with fire. So when you play the fire, you never know where it's going to go, you never know what is going to do. You hopefully you don't get burned, right? Like that's the whole point. That's why your parents tell you never to play the fire because they don't, it's uncontrollable. So I feel like just in general, with anything related to entertainment, you, you sacrifice your time in order to hopefully have something really cool on the other side of that equation. But it's super risky. And so some people they go 10 years, and they do get burned, like they burned a decade of their life, they ended up not achieving anything in the entertainment realm. And there's no track for it either. I mean, there's no like, hey, like, you know, you've earned the award, the salesman of the year, you've put 10 years in, here's a Rolex like, it's not like that at all. So I feel like that transpires specifically to going away to with these contestants, because that is in fact, just like an extension of the entertainment business, which is glassblowing. So they're all artists, everyone in entertainment is an artist, and you're creating something that you're hopefully you enjoy you're passionate about. But you're you hope that other people enjoy your passion, too. And so I feel like it was just a great little line that extended specifically to the show, they're literally playing with fire. I mean, they're literally sculpting with fire. But then on the other side of the equation. That's kind of like it means a lot to say that as an entertainer in general, just because being in I guess like anything entertainment related, that that meaning that saying has a little deeper roots.


Larry

So you've been on screen a lot with your YouTube videos. And then you were on you know, the show the big brother, I'm sure you've done some public speaking and then you get the geek hosting the show blown away. And you said you were kind of intimidated to walk on set with all that was going on? And then you said it just clicked and you felt like you arrived? What's that feeling? like knowing that exactly what you're doing is what you're supposed to be doing?


Unknown Speaker

That's a great question. So I will say this, before I did any of this, I was a professional stunt rollerblader. So I started with, like this, like, I actually liked the mechanism of skating. So I loved I liked the way that it felt like when you were like doing tricks and grinding rails like that, that felt like that was that was awesome. That made sense to me. What sort of transpired from that was being a part of the entertainment industry, kind of unbeknownst to myself, you're being filmed. You're only really doing tricks for camera. And then there was this timeframe where I entered into this contest that I didn't actually qualify for. And I became a professional like overnight, and I felt like I arrived. And then I felt like oh my gosh, like I've always been this good at skating. And now I'm pro but really like overnight, like I didn't get that much better. Like I just was already that good. And now I'm perfect. Now I'm a professional. And so in many ways that moment was totally recreated on the floor. I'm blown away because I've been working in entertainment I would say for about seven years, almost 10 years up until that point. I lived in Chicago for about a year and a half. I did Second City. I did like some commercials just like really small stuff, just trying to understand how the whole thing works. I then went to New York City, I was in New York for three years, I did more of the same, but a lot, you know, bigger stuff. So, so for television, started hosting and started, like, traveling internationally for hosting and then got a big agent, then I did Big Brother. And then I started the YouTube channel, and I started producing my own stuff. Then I was on TV again for the weather channel, and I started producing more stuff. And like, it felt like the pinnacle like when do you make it? You know, when are you the thing? When have you arrived? Like what is that? In skating? It was so cut and dry, because there was amateur and there's professional. And there was like, literally, like a ranking system that would tell you that it's like in the NBA or NFL or whatever it's like when you're not in and, you know, because you're a part of the Pro League. In entertainment. There's no like, hey, you've arrived because we don't really have like sag AFTRA is like not really a thing as it once was in the past because of digital. So being on the ground floor. And as soon as I like said the first time we wrapped in that first episode, I felt like, wow, like all those other things totally prepared me in order to do this efficiently, where I did not feel like a fish out of water actually felt so natural and so comfortable. Because I had produced so much content in that exact same like framework where I knew what kind of cameras they were working with. I knew what the aperture was, I knew what frame rate they were shooting at. I knew what the producers were thinking. I mean, I had filled every single role at one point in time, so that when I was hosting it, even with reality TV, because I was a contestant even so I knew what they were thinking. It really all kind of came together. And I thought, this is a Netflix series. I mean, this is it. I feel like I got my pro wings school. This is it.


Andrew Keller

I'm curious. I mean, probably not many people when they're 10 years old, say I want to grow up and host a Netflix TV show. If I'm curious on your perspective of Did you have hosting in mind, and you worked until you got to where you thought you made it? Or is it I want to work in entertainment. I like doing stuff I'm going to follow where things go and see what happens. Like,


Unknown Speaker

what did it really it's a funny story, actually. So I grew up in Columbus, Ohio, there's like no entertainment in Columbus, Ohio. This is like not like a thing like people that say like, I want to be an actor in Columbus, Ohio. They're like, cool. We have community theater. Like that's, you know, that's where that goes. So I remember when I was a really small kid, and I was watching Nickelodeon. And I remember it was like Clarissa explains it all or like double there. Like it was something of this nature. And I remember asking my parents are, oh my gosh, you guys remember this thing was called, like, legends of the tomb. They had to like, run through this, like, concourse, and they define this golden thing at the end. I don't know if you guys remember this, but it was like, it was basically like, it was like a show that the these kids had to like, get to the end. And they were contestants. And I remember asking my mom, like, hey, like, I want to be like those guys. Like I want to be whatever they're doing. And I remember she specifically said like, Oh, that's like, not for us. Like, that's not we don't do that. Like we're in Ohio. Like that's, that's what people do, like in LA and like, I think was actually filming in Florida, which was the ironic part. It was like, at Universal Studios, like, wasn't even in LA. But I remember thinking like, oh, like, some of these people are actors, and they're not real. And but that looked really fun. So like, I want to go do what they do. But then it seemed like that was closed door. Right? So I was like, Nope, not gonna happen. You're seven. So your parents are like, what are you gonna do like, is Pack your bags and check it out to LA. So I did do community theater, but I didn't really understand what acting was as a profession, like nothing that soars when I got to New York, I really was still kind of like obsessed with the idea of acting as like this childhood dream, like acting professionally is a lot different than what acting looks like it can be for the viewer. A lot of times I get this analogy, it's like, eating cake is like really fun, right? Like everyone likes to have cake and cake is delicious. But baking the cake isn't always really fun. I mean, sometimes it's like it's like hot and like you don't even you know you're full you don't want chocolate cake like just it's work well for the actress I kind of like same thing so it's like consuming entertainment as fun for the viewer. But producing the content is not always fun for the actor or the producer or whatever. So I kind of like fell into this weird sort of like stick where I had to kind of come to reality in New York where I was like I don't think I really like acting like I've really committed a lot to it but I don't really think I like acting like how my you know, co workers and counterparts are like, this is their passion and they love it. At the same time I had I was on this like really low budget short film and the producer said hey, I do this thing. It's called IE asylum. It stands for entertainment asylum and we interview celebrities on press junkets and red carpet and He goes, I just think you have a personality for it. And I was like, Oh, well, I probably he's probably telling me this because there's no budget, right? It's for free stuff. Like, he wants me to go do this thing, and they're not gonna pay me. But hey, maybe this would lead to getting an agent or something. So, the first thing was this, um, we were like, we're at Six Flags. And we had to we were interviewing people for this new


Unknown Speaker

Green Lantern ride or whatever. And then it was gonna go on to interview someone for some Marvel release of some movie that you've probably never heard of, like, wasn't Green Lantern. But then that went really well. And he was like, dude, he was your like, natural hosting. Like, you just have this like, you have a personality. Like you don't mind talking to people. Like, you'll get right up in there and have fun with it. I was like, Yeah, but like anyone can do that. Like everyone does that. Like that's like a thing, like, whatever. And I just thought he was bluffing me because he wanted me to come back. And he wasn't paying me. So that went on actually, like for a while. So I could build a real and then by like, gig number like five or whatever. I sent it to my agent. He's like, Oh, yeah, dude, you like, this is great. Like, you're perfect for this. And as I oh my gosh, hey, look, I mean, if it's not, you know, I guess you can say if it's not broke, don't fix it. But that's not really the right analogy. It's like, hey, look, if it's working, kind of go with it. And so all through my New York career, I was still very, like, hyper focused on acting. But then when I finally moved to LA, I thought, you know what, like, let's just cut the things that aren't working, let's just, let's just not do that. It's not that I like didn't like acting, I just really wasn't passionate about it. And then I started realizing that what I really wanted was I really wanted to be involved in entertainment, but I wanted it to feel more like it was actual real, like it was real, like it was actually happening in real time. And that actually is like docu reality, like, that's like what I do on the YouTube channel. And that's what a reality TV show is. And so I found out actually what I was looking for, was actually to be like a host and like to be essentially like me, but in reality TV and enjoying it as myself. And so it just, I guess it kind of fit and his name was Cesar. Thank you, Cesar. Because he basically got me into this thing. And some of that clips, they still exist on the internet somewhere. Like, I was like interviewing Ryan Reynolds for one of these things. And like, the cast of Horrible Bosses, like some like really, like cool, like ala celebrities, like it was just like a fun, cool thing to do in my 20s. And so it snowballed into basically like the start of like a hosting career,


Larry

that story kind of illustrates something that we're always debating on the show, just doing something versus asking the question, what should I be doing? And so, you know, you probably get pitched on stuff all the time. How, what is that doing? versus like, should I be doing this?


Unknown Speaker

Totally. So like, I for me, because like, again, like, from the beginning of this, like when entertainment, it's so broad. I mean, it's like, you'd be podcasting. You could be playing music, you can be a guitar guy that, you know, dances in Times Square, like, whatever the naked cowboy stuff in entertainment, right? So you don't know what you're going to be good at, because it's a crazy grab bag. And so I if I were to, like, you know, give advice back to myself, when I was in my 20s, I would have said, like, Hey, I mean, just be a little more open about like, what may be the thing that you're going to be really good at. And I think the threshold for sort of changing your career, but you know, being able to follow through and your goals, but not being too wishy washy, is just not understanding what you're actually good at, like, Where are you getting the most gains in? Whatever you're trying? And I think, you know, College is a weird thing. And this probably comes up a lot amongst like, 20 some year olds who are like trying to find their passion or whatever, in college, and it's like, impossible, because you don't have life experience yet. And it's this conundrum. And it's like this, like, self fulfilling, like anxiety, prophecy. They're like, choose what you need to do. And you're like, I've never done it. What am I What's going on here? But with entertainment, there's no like, hyper. When I say like, internship, you just actually got to go out and just do it. Like, no famous actors like hey, you're you can intern for me, like, you can be me on the next take, and then come back and then tell me if you liked it, like, doesn't exist. So I would say like, when you first started entertainment, it's like you really just got to kind of like sample all the things. And then I think the feedback for like, which horses race is winning the race. I think that's where you kind of put some more of your eggs and it's not always a it's always easy. Sometimes you got to swallow your pride and just kind of like put things to rest. Yeah, I


Andrew Keller

mean, you definitely take your lumps going through all that stuff. But Nick, you Haas thank you so much for joining us today. You can find him on Instagram Twitter, tik tok


Unknown Speaker

at Nick,


Andrew Keller

you have q Haas also on the YouTube channel, I made it for Nick and larison Thanks for stopping by.



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