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Buddha died. Jesus died. You will die. I will die.


Andrew

This is re posted.


Andrew Keller

Every morning, Larry and I dig into a form or idea that has caught our eye. Our hope is that our chat inspires you to never stop thinking and possibly challenges you in a new way. If you'd like to help support the show, please visit patreon.com slash reposted. Thank you for stopping by.


Larry

Mr. Keller, I could not get enough of this Michael Easter book that you have turned me on to it's called the comfort crisis. Yesterday we chatted about boredom. Today it's death. Here's a quote from a chapter in the book. And it's quoting a dude from boot pond who said pretend you're walking along a trail, he explained and there's a cliff in 500 yards to catch the cliff his death. And we will all walk off and Buddha died, Jesus died, you're going to die, I will die. I'd like to die on that bed. Do you know? Don't you want to know where the cliff is? he asked. Because only then can we change our course, we could take a more scenic route. Notice the beauty of the trail before it ends. Say the things we truly want to say to the people we're walking with, and quote, the Good Book and the good people of Bhutan argue that the secret to happiness is thinking about your own death. Now I personally do not like thinking about death. Because I feel like I'm gonna Jinx myself. I really mean that. If you like if I think about my death, I'm gonna Jinx myself and I'm gonna die.


Andrew Keller

Well, good news is you will die. So it doesn't matter. At the comfort crisis. You look really comfortable with that sweatshirt on. So I wanted to point that Yeah, thank you. I like that. Yeah, I mean, I think it's interesting. They say take the more scenic route, which traditionally, like a road trip is the longer route. But in life, I don't think it necessarily means the longer route. It's like, Oh, you see the cliff, let's avoid it taking the more scenic route. The way I'm kind of interpreting this is live life to the fullest whether you're going to die when you're 3060 or 90, it doesn't matter. Like I think it's better to die at 30 living a full life and die at 90 to be constantly afraid. And you could look back at 2020 and see all the mental health problems people had by being in isolation and being in constant fear. That's not a life well lived, I would argue.


Larry

So I feel like what the people of Bhutan are saying and what this author, the argument that he's making is that the people have been accepted at some particular point, they're going to die. And it doesn't really matter how it's just going to come in America. I feel like when we die or about to die, we sort of make the excuse, like, wait a minute, this can't be happening to me. We make excuses about it, because we've never accepted it in the first place.


Andrew Keller

Yeah, it's not part of our culture. We Yeah, yeah. I mean, when I was in Bali, I remember I took a tour. And they were talking about how, when someone dies, they're put on display for a week in the town center. And everyone's just like, that's how it is. That's how you pay your respects. It's not a tragically horrible event. It's like, this is what happens and we need to move on. I guess maybe because we're more selfish culture. We think we shouldn't die or or it's more scary when it happens to us. So yeah, I don't like thinking about death either.


Larry

I mean, well, I don't necessarily either. But this, this chapter of this book is definitely made me rethink things. And I was going on a run yesterday, and I started thinking about it. So hopefully, I didn't Jinx myself. But this idea in butanna, they take death differently, like they have ashes that are mixed in with clay and put his sculptures along the side of the road. Often their art deals around death their funerals last 21 days. So they have and by the way, so you say like, Well, whatever, who cares. There's 130/4 most developed nation on Earth, but they're in the top 20 for happiness. we're nowhere near that in America, by the way.


Andrew Keller

Yeah, if you and your wife both died today, would someone on earth know what your last wishes are? Like, how you want to be buried and all that stuff?


Larry

No, they would.


Andrew Keller

Wow. Okay,


Larry

I definitely started thinking about that. And the fact that I really need to do my will Oh, yeah. Will I don't have a Will my kids are gonna go live in an orphanage.


Andrew Keller

Now that you own property, if you don't have a will become increasingly more complicated and the courts get involved. And that's not a that's not a life well lived dealing with probate. Nobody wants to


Larry

listen. So they say this all the time. They mentioned in this article that I think it's well worth saying most people that go into a hospital and are actually dying, they don't have much time to live, they don't think about getting famous or their car or their watch, or the hours working that when they realize that it's eminent they start thinking about the relationship and people and all of the other stuff kind of goes away. So then why do we work so hard to begin with when it At the end, we don't even care about it.


Andrew Keller

Yeah, it's funny, I saw something. Today, it was a headline, William Shatner, Who's 90? So take it easy. Nothing matters in the end. So I mean, that exactly proves your point. When you look back, I mean, he, by all measures had a successful career, when you look back, like, it doesn't really matter. After looking at this, are you gonna make any minor or major changes in your life? Or are you thinking about it?


Larry

Absolutely, absolutely. Actually, this, this chapter opened me up to think about it. I really like this quote, when you understand that nothing is permanent, you cannot help but follow a better, happier path. I feel like once again, that's sort of an American ethos that we're entitled to whatever we have, and it's going to last forever. Just as a minor example, I feel like some people think that with jobs, and then they get fired, you are never guaranteed that job at the beginning, but you think you should have it forever.


Andrew Keller

Yeah, I completely agree with that. It's like, I don't know, time to accept things move on. It's sweating the small stuff. A lot of times, it's easier said than done. But it's I mean, I guess like this, it's a good exercise to kind of look back, I'd like to offer a suggestion on something you can change, if you are willing to get rid of your three day Amazon rule, if you want to buy it, yellow baby.


Larry

I'm okay. I'm definitely this, this, this has made me think about my life a little bit. And there's really nothing that I that I want anymore, I kind of would love to have a successful career, but not like, but just in the fact that I was doing the right thing for two decades. And I don't know if I'll ever get that confirmation. So it doesn't really matter. But, you know, I got to get married, I got to have kids, this last thing was like buying a house. And I got to do that. So I've kind of come to the conclusion. There's really nothing left major in my life that I really wanted to do. I think it was a minor thing you just said. But it's interesting. You did the right thing.


Andrew Keller

I think people generally accept that doing the right thing is a universally accepted truth. But I think doing the right thing is subjective. Which is kind of interesting. For sure. Um, I feel like I do the right thing. But I would I would think a lot of people disagree with my, you know, my opinion.


Larry

One of the cool traditions we have in my family, we started it in our backyard in Southern California. And we me and my wife continued it when someone passes away. We try to buy them a tree. So our intern his mother passed away almost two years ago. And we bought him a lemon tree for his backyard, and he planted it. And this lemon tree is kicking ass. It like has so much lemons. But it's this great thing where he mentions it gets it's right in the middle of his yard. And we always end up talking about his mom because of this lemon tree. And I feel like that's the circle of life. Andrew, we get to talk about the circle of life because there's a limit tree in his backyard.


Andrew Keller

Yeah. And even the lemon tree will die one day.


Larry

Well, but I mean, yes, Andrew. Sure. But here's the Yes. Here's what I will say that I've recently been thinking. This this. I've been reading this book about subatomic particles and particles. And I mentioned this before 98% of the universe at the Big Bang was completely informed three minutes after the universe was formed. Big Bang, three minutes, everything that's ever existed in the universe was created. Particles go on forever, particles. Atoms never die. They just keep going on. They moved from my body to the ground to the dirt to a tree. There's just a little bit of an eternal perspective. It's made me feel a little bit better about death. Particles live forever, gives me hope that there's some sort of universal experience for all of us. I don't know what that is. But you can see in actual matter, that there's some universe universal Miss.


Andrew Keller

Yeah. Which I guess is probably rooted in what culture is that subscribe to the reincarnation idea? Totally, like, Well, my particles are gonna dissipate and then reappear somewhere else. And that's, I guess that's kind of that way you don't ever have to deal with death because you're not going to die. You're still good.


Larry

I hope my particles come back as a good poker player. Can you make that happen?


Andrew Keller

Yeah, come back is Larry moneymaker Well, if you're still wondering what Larry put in his Amazon package, tune back in tomorrow at repost a podcast on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. I'm Andrew Keller for cherry Garcia saying thanks for stopping by.



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